The Birthright

It has been a while since I have written on this blog. I’ve been busy with changes in life that will hopefully bring good outcomes. With changes come new experiences that can leave people ‘stuck in a moment’. In that moment we can make good decisions of we can make bad decisions.

In Genesis 25:29-34 we read a story about Jacob and Easu. Here we find Easu stuck in a moment. He was hungry. He had been out in the fields and came home weary and famished from his endeavours. As he came in, he smells Jacob’s cooking. It smells good and stirs his growling stomach. Easu politely asks for some.

Jacob sees an opportunity. He knows his brother. He knows that Easu can act impatiently, so Jacob takes advantage of the situation and demands that Easu sells his birthright for something to eat.

Easu, thinking that his birthright is of not much practical use in that moment, obliges. As we read through the story of the Pentateuch we understand that the birthright relates to a spiritual blessing from God.

There are some Jewish teachers that say Easu is the most hated person of Judaism. He sold the opportunity to be their forefather for a bowl of food. He gave up the right to be in the midst of God’s special attention in exchange for a temporary respite from some of this world’s hardships.

This story leaves me asking myself how quickly I sell out the benefits of future spiritual blessings for a temporary moment of pleasure, which is really only a temporary salve on the wounds that come from this fallen world? To put it another way, what of my spiritual birthrights, coming from my spiritual birth, am I willing to trade for material benefits?

It also leaves me considering my adversary. Jacob was an adversary to Easu. He understood Easu. He knew when he was vulnerable and knew when to strike. I too have an adversary, a spiritual one. He also knows when and how I’m vulnerable. He knows when I can be ‘stuck in a moment’. I ask myself, Do I know when I’m vulnerable and how can I prepare myself for those moments?

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Thanks for reading. What do you think? Do these questions relate to you? How?

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